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Safety

Europe is one of the safest places to travel in the world. However, even Europe has to deal with natural disasters, civil unrest, terrorism, health risks and events that could pose safety risks. Wherever there are humans, there is always some crime like theft, kidnapping or hostage taking.

The primary crime committed on unsuspecting tourists are overcharging for services, coercing you into paying for a service you don’t want and theft. Pick pockets are very common throughout Europe, especially in high tourists areas or large crowded areas like train stations and on buses and subways. Many work in groups so while one does something to distract you, another is pick pocketing your tote, purse or pocket. Be aware of individuals walking up to you asking for directions, information or to sign petitions. If they continue to pester you, walk away and keep your hand over your purse, bag or pocket securely. Some may hand you a wrist band or other object then demand payment, hand it back and walk away, always saying no thank you.

Beggars and peddlers…As in the US there are the homeless and disadvantage that beg for money but, most are not as aggressive as in the US. They usually do not verbally ask for money but, will have a hat or cup out to collect money in. Many will work the crowds and congested areas where there are a lot of tourists and commuters. There are also street peddlers selling souvenirs and gifts however, this is illegal in many cities. You will notice their goods are on blankets so when the police are visible they can easily grab all there goods in the blankets and quickly depart the area. This allows them to set up shop in a different local away form police.

Be aware of your surroundings and where you are…While in the big cities it is nice to get away from the big tourists areas to get a feel for the cities neighborhoods and people. Know where you are going before you go and how you are getting there. Know which bus line or subway you are taking and have a map or smart device with you in case you get disoriented. Ask in your concierge, guide or tourists office, in advance, where some of the good neighborhoods are to visit and that they are safe.

Don’t Attract Attention…Try not to make yourself a tourist target by sticking out of the crowd, fly under the radar.  Acting or dressing like a typical tourists will only draw attention to yourself. Leave the white tennis shoes, the “Don’t Mess with Texas” t-shirt and Yankees baseball cap at home. Men avoid wearing shorts, especially in the larger cities. Do not wear expensive jewelry or watches. Keep phones and cameras close to you. When talking on the phone stand aside of people especially in stations or when riding on buses, metros, etc. Do not walk around reading maps or tourist literature. Look like a local not a visitor.

When Shopping…When buying items, it is best to keep your money folded backwards with small bills on the outside and larger on the inside and bring out your cash only when actually handing it over. Also, separate larger sums from smaller ones and keep the former hidden on your person. Do not expose multiple credit cards at once, keep the one you want to use in a money belt.

Be polite…Don’t make loud rude comments about their customs and say “that’s not the way we do it”. Remember, you’re in their country and you should be there on their terms so think before you express an opinion about something. What seems odd to us, to them is perfectly normal. Sounds reasonable right? Do not argue over misunderstandings due to poor translating of the languages. Unfortunately, we see it happen on every trip, loud obnoxious people embarrassing themselves.

Public protests and events…Almost all European countries are open Democratic societies that allow freedom of the press and civil protest. In large cities you may experience public demonstrations. Do not get involve and participate in any demonstrations. Ask a police officer if there is way you can travel around the demonstration to avoid it. If you see any unlawful activity take place, leave the area immediately so you do not become confused with the perpetrators.

If you’re on your best behavior you shouldn’t you run into any legal problems but, if something does happen, contact the nearest US Embassy listed on our emergency page.

Most Europeans like Americans and will welcome you warmly but, there are always some who hate Americans, for the right or wrong reasons. Your good behavior and awareness will keep you safe.

Travel Advisory Levels…

Below are guidelines provided by the US Department of State for each country. Click on links for more detailed information on Crime, Demonstrations and Protests, Domestic Violence, Political Unrest, Scams, Strikes, Terrorism and Tourism.

Level 1

Exercise Normal Precautions

This is the lowest advisory level for safety and security risk. There is some risk in any international travel. Conditions in other countries may differ from those in the United States and may change at any time.      

Level 2

Exercise Increased Precaution

Be aware of heightened risks to safety and security. The Department of State provides additional advice for travelers in these areas in the Travel Advisory. Conditions in any country may change at any time.  

Level 3

Reconsider Travel

Avoid travel due to serious risks to safety and security. The Department of State provides additional advice for travelers in these areas in the Travel Advisory. Conditions in any country may change at any time. 

Level 4

Do Not Travel

This is the highest advisory level due to greater likelihood of life-threatening risks. During an emergency, the U.S. government may have very limited ability to provide assistance. The Department of State advises that U.S. citizens not travel to the country or to leave as soon as it is safe to do so. The Department of State provides additional advice for travelers in these areas in the Travel Advisory. Conditions in any country may change at any time. 

The U.S. Department of State issues an overall Travel Advisory level for a country, but levels of advice may vary for specific locations or areas within a country. For instance, they may advise U.S. citizens to “Exercise increased caution” (Level 2) in a country, but to “Reconsider travel” (Level 3) to a particular area within the country.

Safe Travel Advice by Country

Click on the country below to scroll to the latest travel advice from the US Department of State. Country’s are rank by safety and security from the Legatum Prosperity Index developed by the Legatum Institute. The United States ranked 69th.

Safe Travel Advice within Cities

All European cities are very safe in comparison to most of the the large cities in other parts of the world including the United States. Like all large cities they have their advantages and disadvantages when it come to safety so precautions should always be taken. Areas of the cities have been subject to drug abuse, homelessness and gang activities and violence. Ask locals for information on which areas to avoid. In some instances these areas are perfectly safe during the day but, rough activity can occur at night and sometimes they can just be intimidating. If you do have to go out at night stay around well lighted areas and other people.
Crowded tourists areas are especially the targets for pick pockets and scammers as well as public transit, the stations and while riding on buses, metros, etc. Be cautious when strangers come up and talk to you so they can distract you while their partner tries to rob a possession. Scammers offer you something then ask for money or try to sell you fake items or tickets. Never pull money or credit cards out to give to a supposed charitable organization.
After recent terrorists attacks police presence has been elevated and security cameras monitor activity at many tourists sites and public transit.
Click on the cities below to scroll to city specific information.

Albania

April 19, 2022
Albania – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution in Albania due to crime.
Country Summary: Law enforcement’s ability to protect and assist travelers is limited in some areas, especially in remote regions. There has been targeted violence associated with illicit drug networks and organized crime countrywide. Travelers should remain aware of their surroundings and the extent of police and emergency services in their area.
Read the country information page for additional information to Albania.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Albania has a high level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel. 
If you decide to travel to Albania:
Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information.
Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
Review the Country Security Report for Albania.
Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.
Last Update: Reissued with updates to crime and health information.

Andorra

April 19, 2022
Andorra – Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

Exercise normal precautions when traveling to Andorra.
Country Summary: Entry to Andorra can only be done via Spain and France.
Read the country information page for more information on travel to Andorra.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Andorra has a high level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Informationrelated to your travel.  
If you decide to travel to Andorra:
Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information.
Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.
Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Austria

April 19, 2022
Austria – Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

Exercise normal precautions in Austria.
Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Austria.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Austria has a high level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Informationrelated to your travel.
If you decide to travel to Austria:
Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information.  
Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
Review the Country Security Report for Austria.
Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.
Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Belarus

June 13, 2022
Belarus – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Belgium

April 19, 2022
Belgium – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution in Belgium due to terrorism.
Country Summary: Terrorist groups continue plotting possible attacks in Belgium. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, local government facilities, hotels, clubs, restaurants, places of worship, parks, major sporting, music, and cultural events, educational institutions, airports, and other public areas.
Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Belgium.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Belgium has a high level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Informationrelated to your travel.
If you decide to travel to Belgium:
Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information.   
Be aware of your surroundings when traveling to tourist locations and crowded public venues.
Monitor local media for breaking events and be prepared to adjust your plans.
Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter
Review the Country Security Report for Belgium.
Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.
Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Bosnia & Herzegovina

May 31, 2022
Bosnia and Herzegovina – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution in Bosnia and Herzegovina due to terrorism and land mines.
Country Summary: Terrorist groups continue plotting possible attacks in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, local government facilities, hotels, clubs, restaurants, places of worship, parks, major sporting and cultural events, educational institutions, airports, and other public areas.
Minefields and land mines are present throughout Bosnia and Herzegovina. While suspected hazardous areas are normally clearly marked, several people are killed or injured each year.
Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Bosnia and Herzegovina.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Bosnia and Herzegovina has a moderate level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.  
If you decide to travel to Bosnia and Herzegovina:

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information.   
Be aware of your surroundings when traveling to tourist locations and crowded public venues.
Monitor local media for breaking events and adjust your plans based on new information.
Remain on hard-surfaced roads and stay out of abandoned buildings due to risks from land mines.
Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter. 
Review the Country Security Report for Bosnia and Herzegovina.
Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist. 

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Bulgaria

April 19, 2002
Bulgaria – Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

Exercise normal precautions in Bulgaria.
Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Bulgaria.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Bulgaria has a high level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Informationrelated to your travel.
If you decide to travel to Bulgaria:
Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information.  
Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
Review the Country Security Report for Bulgaria.
Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.
Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Croatia

April 19, 2022
Croatia – Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

Exercise normal precautions in Croatia.
Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Croatia.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Croatia has a high level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Informationrelated to your travel.
If you decide to travel to Croatia:
Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information.  
Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
Review the Country Security Report for Croatia.
Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.
Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Cyprus

April 19, 2022
Cyprus – Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

Exercise normal precautions in Cyprus. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.
Country Summary: Do not attempt to enter the United Nations buffer zone at any place other than a designated crossing point. Police and UN forces strictly enforce this restriction.
Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Cyprus.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Cyprus has a high level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Informationrelated to your travel.
If you decide to travel to Cyprus:
Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information.
Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive security messages and make it easier to locate you in an emergency
Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
Review the Country Security Report for Cyprus.
Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.
UN Buffer Zone: Since 1974, the southern part of Cyprus has been under the control of the government of the Republic of Cyprus. The northern part of Cyprus, administered by Turkish Cypriots, proclaimed itself the “Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus” (“TRNC”) in 1983. The United States does not recognize the “TRNC,” nor does any country other than Turkey. A buffer zone patrolled by the UN Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus, separates the two sides. For U.S. citizen travelers:
Enter and exit the Republic of Cyprus ONLY at Larnaca and Paphos airports and at the seaports of Limassol, Larnaca, and Paphos. The Republic of Cyprus does not consider entry at Ercan Airport in the north to be a “legal” entrance into Cyprus.
You cannot receive a residency permit from the Republic of Cyprus to reside in the area north of the UN buffer zone.
Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Czechia

April 19, 2022
Czech Republic – Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

Exercise normal precautions in the Czech Republic.
Read the country information page for additional information on travel to the Czech Republic.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined the Czech Republic has a high level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.
If you decide to travel to the Czech Republic:
Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information.
Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
Review the Country Security Report for the Czech Republic.
Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.
Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Denmark

June 7, 2022
Denmark – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution in the Kingdom of Denmark due to terrorism.
Country Summary: Terrorist groups continue plotting possible attacks in the Kingdom of Denmark.Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, local government facilities, hotels, clubs, restaurants, places of worship, parks, major sporting and cultural events, educational institutions, airports, and other public areas.
Read the country information page for additional information on travel to the Kingdom of Denmark which includes the Faroe Islands and Greenland.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Denmark and the Faroe Islands have a high level of COVID-19. The level of COVID-19 in Greenland is currently unknown.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.  
If you decide to travel to the Kingdom of Denmark:
Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information.   
Be aware of your surroundings when traveling to tourist locations and crowded public venues.
Follow the instructions of local authorities.
Monitor local media for breaking events and adjust your plans based on new information.
Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter. 
Review the Country Security Report for Denmark.
Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued after periodic review with minor edits.

Estonia

April 19, 2022
Estonia – Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

Exercise normal precautions in Estonia.
Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Estonia.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Estonia has a high level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Informationrelated to your travel.
If you decide to travel to Estonia:
Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the U.S. Embassy’s web page for country-specific COVID-19 information.
Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
Review the Country Security Report for Estonia.
Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.
Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Finland

April 19, 2022
Finland – Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

Exercise normal precautions in Finland.
Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Finland.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Finland has a high level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Informationrelated to your travel.
If you decide to travel to Finland:
Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information.  
Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive travel alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
Review the Country Security Report for Finland.
Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.
Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

France

April 19, 2022
France – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution in France due to terrorism and civil unrest.
Country Summary: Terrorist groups continue plotting possible attacks in France. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, local government facilities, hotels, clubs, restaurants, places of worship, parks, major sporting and cultural events, educational institutions, airports, and other public areas.
Demonstrations in Paris and other major cities continue in France and are expected to continue in the coming weeks. Property damage, including looting and arson, in populated tourist areas has occurred with reckless disregard for public safety. Police have responded with water cannons, rubber bullets, and tear gas. The U.S. Embassy is advising official U.S. government travelers to avoid travel to Paris and other major cities in France on the weekends.
Read the country information page for additional information on travel to France.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined France has a high level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.  
If you decide to travel to France:
Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information.  
Be aware of your surroundings when traveling to tourist locations and large crowded public venues.
Avoid demonstrations.
Review travel plans if you will be in France on weekends.
Follow the instructions of local authorities including movement restrictions related to any ongoing police action.
Find a safe location, and shelter in place if in the vicinity of large gatherings or protests.
Monitor local media for breaking events and adjust your plans based on new information.
Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
Review the Country Security Report for France.
Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.
Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information

Germany

April 19, 2022
Germany – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution in Germany due to terrorism.
Country Summary: Terrorist groups continue plotting possible attacks in Germany. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, local government facilities, hotels, clubs, restaurants, places of worship, parks, major sporting and cultural events, educational institutions, airports, and other public areas.
Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Germany.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Germany has a high level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.
If you decide to travel to Germany:
Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information.   
Be aware of your surroundings when traveling to tourist locations and crowded public venues.
Follow the instructions of local authorities.
Monitor local media for breaking events and adjust your plans based on new information.
Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter
Review the Country Security Report for Germany.
Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.
Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Greece

April 19, 2022
Greece – Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

Exercise normal precautions in Greece.
Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Greece.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Greece has a high level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Informationrelated to your travel.
If you decide to travel to Greece:
Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information.  
Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive security messages and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
Review the Country Security Report for Greece.
Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.
Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Holy See

See Italy

Hungary

April 19, 2022
Hungary – Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

Exercise normal precautions in Hungary.
Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Hungary.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Hungary has a high level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Informationrelated to your travel.
If you decide to travel to Hungary:
Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information.  
Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
Review the Country Security Report for Hungary.
Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.
Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

🇮🇸 Iceland

April 19, 2022
Iceland – Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

Exercise normal precautions in Iceland.
Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Iceland.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Iceland has a high level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Informationrelated to your travel.
If you decide to travel to Iceland: 
Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information.  
Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency. 
Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
Review the Country Security Report for Iceland. 
Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist
Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Ireland

April 19, 2022
Ireland – Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

Exercise normal precautions in Ireland.
Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Ireland.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Ireland has a high level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Informationrelated to your travel.
If you decide to travel to Ireland:
Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information.  
Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
Review the Country Security Report for Ireland.
Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.
Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Italy

April 19, 2022
Italy – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to terrorism.
Country Summary: Terrorist groups continue plotting possible attacks in Italy. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, local government facilities, hotels, clubs, restaurants, places of worship, parks, major sporting and cultural events, educational institutions, airports, and other public areas.
Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Italy.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Italy has a high level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.
If you decide to travel to Italy:
Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information.  
Be aware of your surroundings when traveling to tourist locations and crowded public venues.
Follow the instructions of local authorities.
Monitor local media for breaking events and adjust your plans based on new information.
Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
Review the Country Security Report for Italy.
Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.
Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Latvia

April 19, 2022
Latvia – Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

Exercise normal precautions in Latvia.
Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Latvia.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Latvia has a high level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.  
If you decide to travel to Latvia:
Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information.  
Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive travel alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
Review the Country Security Report for Latvia.
Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.
Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Liechtenstein

April 19, 2022
Liechtenstein – Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

Exercise normal precautions in Liechtenstein.
Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Liechtenstein.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Liechtenstein has a high level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.
If you decide to travel to Liechtenstein:
Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information.  
Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
Review the Country Security Report for Switzerland.
Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.
Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Lithuania

April 18, 2022
Lithuania – Level 1: Exercise Normal Precaution s

Exercise normal precautions in Lithuania.
Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Lithuania.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Lithuania has a high level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Informationrelated to your travel.
If you decide to travel to Lithuania:
Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information.
Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive travel alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
Review the Country Security Report for Lithuania.
Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations.  Review the Traveler’s Checklist.
Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Luxembourg

April 25, 2022
Luxembourg – Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

Exercise normal precautions when traveling to Luxembourg.
Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Luxembourg.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Luxembourg has a high level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Informationrelated to your travel.  
If you decide to travel to Luxembourg:
Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information.
Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
Review the Country Security Report for Luxembourg.
Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations.  Review the Traveler’s Checklist.
Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Malta

April 19, 2022
Malta – Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

Exercise normal precautions in Malta.
Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Malta.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Malta has a high level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.
If you decide to travel to Malta:
Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information.  
Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
Review the Country Security Report for Malta.
Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.
Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Moldova

June 21, 2022
Moldova – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.
Reconsider travel to Moldova due toarmed conflict in neighboring Ukraine.  Some areas have increased risk.  Read the entire Travel Advisory.
Do Not Travel To: 
The Transnistria breakaway region due to the unresolved conflict with the central government.
Country Summary: On February 23, Moldovan authorities declared a State of Emergency for a period of 60 days in light of the regional crisis, which has been extended until June 20.  As a result of the Russian military invasion of Ukraine, there are approximately 90,000 refugees residing in Moldova, but there has been no military spillover from the conflict.  Chisinau airport is operating, although there are no flights currently available to Ukraine, Russia, or Belarus.
Read the Moldova country information page for additional information on travel.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Moldova has a low level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Informationrelated to your travel. 
If you decide to travel to Moldova:
Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information.
Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
Review the Country Security Report for Moldova.
U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.
Transnistria – Level 4: Do Not Travel
Do not travel to Transnistria due to armed conflict in neighboring Ukraine and the unresolved conflict between this breakaway region and the central government.  Several small explosions occurred in the Transnistria region in April and early May, but there were no casualties.  Transnistria is a breakaway region that is not under the control of the Moldovan government in Chisinau. Ukraine has closed its border crossing points into the Transnistrian region.  U.S. citizens should depart Transnistria immediately via commercial or private means.  Visitors may encounter difficulties at checkpoints along roads leading into and out of Transnistria.  Taking photographs of military facilities and security forces is prohibited and may result in trouble with authorities.
The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens traveling in Transnistria as there are restrictions on U.S. government employees traveling to the area.
Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Monaco

See France

Montenegro

April 19, 2022
Montenegro – Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

Exercise normal precautions in Montenegro.
Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Montenegro.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Montenegro has a high level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Informationrelated to your travel.
If you decide to travel to Montenegro:
Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information.  
Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
Review the Country Security Report for Montenegro.
Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.
Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Netherlands

April 19, 2022
Netherlands – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution in the Netherlands due to terrorism.
Country Summary: Terrorists continue plotting possible attacks in the Netherlands. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, local government facilities, hotels, clubs, restaurants, places of worship, parks, major sporting and cultural events, educational institutions, airports, and other public areas.
Read the country information page for additional information on travel to the Netherlands.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined the Netherlands has a high level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.
If you decide to travel to the Netherlands:
Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information.   
Be aware of your surroundings when traveling to tourist locations and large crowded public venues.
Follow the instructions of local authorities including movement restrictions related to any ongoing police action.
Monitor local media for breaking events and adjust your plans based on new information.
Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter
Review the Country Security Report for the Netherlands.
Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.
Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

North Macedonia

April 19, 2022
North Macedonia – Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

Exercise normal precautions in North Macedonia.
Read the country information page for additional information on travel to North Macedonia.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined North Macedonia has a high level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.
If you decide to travel to North Macedonia:
Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information.  
Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
Review the Country Security Report for North Macedonia.
Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.
Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Norway

April 19, 2022
Norway – Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

Exercise normal precautions in Norway.
Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Norway.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Norway has a high level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Informationrelated to your travel.  
If you decide to travel to Norway:
Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information.
Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive travel alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
Review the Country Security Report for Norway.
Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.
Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Poland

June 6, 2022
Poland – Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

Exercise normal precautions in Poland.
Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Poland.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Poland has a moderate level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.
If you decide to travel to Poland:                     
Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information.
Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
Review the Country Security Report for Poland.
Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations.  Review the Traveler’s Checklist.
Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Portugal

April 19, 2022
Portugal – Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

Exercise normal precautions in Portugal.
Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Portugal.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Portugal has a high level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Informationrelated to your travel.
If you decide to travel to Portugal:
Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information.  
Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive travel alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
Review the Country Security Report for Portugal.
Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.
Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Romania

June 21, 2022
Romania – Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.
Exercise normal precautions in Romania.
Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Romania.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Romania has a moderate level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.
If you decide to travel to Romania:
Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information.  
Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
Review the Country Security Report for Romania.
U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Russia

June 27, 2022
Russia – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Click Here for Important Information for U.S. Citizens Seeking to Depart Russia (Updated Daily).
Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information and updates to U.S. government employee restrictions
Do not travel to Russia due to the unprovoked and unjustified invasion of Ukraine by Russian military forces, the potential for harassment against U.S. citizens by Russian government security officials, the singling out of U.S. citizens in Russia by Russian government security officials including for detention, the arbitrary enforcement of local lawlimited flights into and out of Russia, the Embassy’s limited ability to assist U.S. citizens in RussiaCOVID-19-related restrictions, and terrorism. U.S. citizens residing or travelling in Russia should depart Russia immediately.
U.S. citizens should note that U.S. credit and debit cards no longer work in Russia, and options to electronically transfer funds from the United States are extremely limited as a result of sanctions imposed on Russian banks. There are reports of cash shortages within Russia.
Limited commercial flight options and overland routes by car and bus are still open and available. If you wish to depart Russia, you should make arrangements on your own as soon as possible. The U.S. Embassy has severe limitations on its ability to assist U.S. citizens, and conditions, including transportation options, may suddenly become even more limited. U.S. citizens who are able to depart Russia for another country and are in need of emergency assistance upon arrival may contact a U.S. embassy or consulate in that country.
Due to Russia’s further invasion of Ukraine, an increasing number of airlines are cancelling flights into and out of Russia, and numerous countries have closed their airspace to Russian airlines. In addition, airspace around southern Russia is restricted, and a number of airports in the area have closed. U.S. citizens located in, or considering travel to, the districts of the Russian Federation immediately bordering Ukraine should be aware that the situation along the border is dangerous and unpredictable. Given the ongoing armed conflict, U.S. citizens are strongly advised against traveling by land from Russia to Ukraine. In addition, there is the potential throughout Russia of harassment of foreigners, including through regulations targeted specifically against foreigners.
The U.S. government’s ability to provide routine or emergency services to U.S. citizens in Russia is severely limited, particularly in areas far from the U.S. Embassy in Moscow, due to Russian government limitations on travel, the number of U.S. staff, and the ongoing suspension of operations, including consular services, at U.S. consulates.
Do Not Travel to:
The North Caucasus, including Chechnya and Mount Elbrus, due to terrorismkidnapping, and risk of civil unrest.
Crimea due to Russia’s occupation of the Ukrainian territory and abuses by its occupying authorities.
Country Summary: U.S. citizens, including former and current U.S. government and military personnel and private citizens engaged in business, who are visiting or residing in Russia have been interrogated without cause and threatened by Russian officials, and may become victims of harassment, mistreatment, and extortion. All U.S. government personnel should carefully consider their need to travel to Russia.
Russian security services have arrested U.S. citizens on spurious charges, singled out U.S. citizens in Russia for detention and/or harassment, denied them fair and transparent treatment, and have convicted them in secret trials and/or without presenting credible evidence. Russian officials may unreasonably delay U.S. consular assistance to detained U.S. citizens. Russian authorities arbitrarily enforce local laws against U.S. citizen religious workers and open questionable criminal investigations against U.S. citizens engaged in religious activity. Russian security services are increasing the arbitrary enforcement of local laws to target foreign and international organizations they consider “undesirable,” and U.S. citizens should avoid travel to Russia to perform work for or volunteer with non-governmental organizations. Russian authorities may not notify the U.S. Embassy of the detention of a U.S. citizen, and consular access to detainees may be denied or severely delayed.
Russia enforces special restrictions on dual U.S.-Russian nationals and may refuse to acknowledge dual nationals’ U.S. citizenship, including denying access to U.S. consular assistance and preventing their departure from Russia.
The rights to peaceful assembly and freedom of expression are not guaranteed in Russia, and U.S. citizens should avoid all political or social protests.
Terrorist groups, transnational and local terrorist organizations, and individuals inspired by extremist ideology continue plotting possible attacks in Russia. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, local government facilities, hotels, clubs, restaurants, places of worship, parks, major sporting and cultural events, educational institutions, airports, and other public areas.
The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued a Notice to Air Missions (NOTAM) prohibiting U.S. aviation operations into, out of, within, or over those areas of the Moscow Flight Information Region (FIR), the Samara FIR (UWWW) and the Rostov-na-Donu (URRV) FIR within 160NM of the boundaries of the Dnipro (UKDV) Flight Information Regions. For more information, U.S. citizens should consult the Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions, and Notices.
Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Russia.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Russia has a moderate level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.  There are restrictions in place affecting U.S. citizen entry into Russia.
If you decide to travel to Russia:
Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information.
Familiarize yourself with the information on what the U.S. government can and cannot do to assist you in a crisis overseas.
Have a contingency plan in place that does not rely on U.S. government assistance. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.
Monitor local and international media for breaking events and adjust your contingency plans based on the new information.
Ensure travel documents are valid and easily accessible.
Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.
Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
Review the Country Security Report for Russia.
Get a COVID vaccine to facilitate your travel.
Understand the COVID testing and vaccine requirements for all countries that you will transit through to your destination.
North Caucasus (including Chechnya and Mount Elbrus) – Level 4: Do Not Travel
Terrorist attacks and risk of civil unrest continue throughout the North Caucasus region, including in Chechnya, North Ossetia, Ingushetia, Dagestan, Stavropol, Karachayevo-Cherkessiya, and Kabardino-Balkariya. Local gangs have kidnapped U.S. citizens and other foreigners for ransom. There have been credible reports of arrest, torture, and extrajudicial killing of LGBTQI+ persons in Chechnya allegedly conducted by Chechen regional authorities.
Do not attempt to climb Mount Elbrus, as travelers must pass close to volatile and insecure areas of the North Caucasus region. The U.S. government is unable to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens traveling in the North Caucasus region, including Mount Elbrus, as U.S. government employees are prohibited from traveling to the region.
Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.
Crimea – Level 4: Do Not Travel
The international community, including the United States and Ukraine, does not recognize Russia’s purported annexation of Crimea. There is extensive Russian Federation military presence in Crimea. Russia staged its further invasion of Ukraine, in part, from occupied Crimea, and Russia is likely to take further military actions in Crimea as part of its occupation of this part of Ukraine. There are continuing abuses against foreigners and the local population by the occupation authorities in Crimea, particularly against those who are seen as challenging their authority on the peninsula.
The U.S. government is unable to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens traveling in Crimea, as U.S. government employees are prohibited from traveling to Crimea.
Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.
Do not travel to Russia due to the unprovoked and unjustified invasion of Ukraine by Russian military forces, the potential for harassment against U.S. citizens by Russian government security officials, the singling out of U.S. citizens in Russia by Russian government security officials including for detention, the arbitrary enforcement of local lawlimited flights into and out of Russia, the Embassy’s limited ability to assist U.S. citizens in RussiaCOVID-19-related restrictions, and terrorismU.S. citizens residing or travelling in Russia should depart Russia immediately.
U.S. citizens should note that U.S. credit and debit cards no longer work in Russia, and options to electronically transfer funds from the United States are extremely limited as a result of sanctions imposed on Russian banks. There are reports of cash shortages within Russia.
Limited commercial flight options and overland routes by car and bus are still open and available. If you wish to depart Russia, you should make arrangements on your own as soon as possible. The U.S. Embassy has severe limitations on its ability to assist U.S. citizens, and conditions, including transportation options, may suddenly become even more limited. U.S. citizens who are able to depart Russia for another country and are in need of emergency assistance upon arrival may contact a U.S. embassy or consulate in that country.
Due to Russia’s further invasion of Ukraine, an increasing number of airlines are cancelling flights into and out of Russia, and numerous countries have closed their airspace to Russian airlines. In addition, airspace around southern Russia is restricted, and a number of airports in the area have closed. U.S. citizens located in, or considering travel to, the districts of the Russian Federation immediately bordering Ukraine should be aware that the situation along the border is dangerous and unpredictable. Given the ongoing armed conflict, U.S. citizens are strongly advised against traveling by land from Russia to Ukraine. In addition, there is the potential throughout Russia of harassment of foreigners, including through regulations targeted specifically against foreigners.
The U.S. government’s ability to provide routine or emergency services to U.S. citizens in Russia is severely limited, particularly in areas far from the U.S. Embassy in Moscow, due to Russian government limitations on travel, the number of U.S. staff, and the ongoing suspension of operations, including consular services, at U.S. consulates.
On February 28, the Department of State authorized the voluntary departure of eligible family members and non-emergency personnel from U.S. Embassy Moscow.
Do Not Travel to:
The North Caucasus, including Chechnya and Mount Elbrus, due to terrorismkidnapping, and risk of civil unrest.
Crimea due to Russia’s occupation of the Ukrainian territory and abuses by its occupying authorities.
Country Summary: U.S. citizens, including former and current U.S. government and military personnel and private citizens engaged in business, who are visiting or residing in Russia have been interrogated without cause and threatened by Russian officials, and may become victims of harassment, mistreatment, and extortion. All U.S. government personnel should carefully consider their need to travel to Russia.
Russian security services have arrested U.S. citizens on spurious charges, singled out U.S. citizens in Russia for detention and/or harassment, denied them fair and transparent treatment, and have convicted them in secret trials and/or without presenting credible evidence. Russian officials may unreasonably delay U.S. consular assistance to detained U.S. citizens. Russian authorities arbitrarily enforce local laws against U.S. citizen religious workers and open questionable criminal investigations against U.S. citizens engaged in religious activity. Russian security services are increasing the arbitrary enforcement of local laws to target foreign and international organizations they consider “undesirable,” and U.S. citizens should avoid travel to Russia to perform work for or volunteer with non-governmental organizations. Russian authorities may not notify the U.S. Embassy of the detention of a U.S. citizen, and consular access to detainees may be denied or severely delayed.
Russia enforces special restrictions on dual U.S.-Russian nationals and may refuse to acknowledge dual nationals’ U.S. citizenship, including denying access to U.S. consular assistance and preventing their departure from Russia.
The rights to peaceful assembly and freedom of expression are not guaranteed in Russia, and U.S. citizens should avoid all political or social protests.
Terrorist groups, transnational and local terrorist organizations, and individuals inspired by extremist ideology continue plotting possible attacks in Russia. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, local government facilities, hotels, clubs, restaurants, places of worship, parks, major sporting and cultural events, educational institutions, airports, and other public areas.
The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued a Notice to Air Missions (NOTAM) prohibiting U.S. aviation operations into, out of, within, or over those areas of the Moscow Flight Information Region (FIR), the Samara FIR (UWWW) and the Rostov-na-Donu (URRV) FIR within 160NM of the boundaries of the Dnipro (UKDV) Flight Information Regions. For more information, U.S. citizens should consult the Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions, and Notices.
Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Russia.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Russia has a high level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.  There are restrictions in place affecting U.S. citizen entry into Russia.
If you decide to travel to Russia:
Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information.
Familiarize yourself with the information on what the U.S. government can and cannot do to assist you in a crisis overseas.
Have a contingency plan in place that does not rely on U.S. government assistance. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.
Monitor local and international media for breaking events and adjust your contingency plans based on the new information.
Ensure travel documents are valid and easily accessible.
Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.
Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
Review the Country Security Report for Russia.
Get a COVID vaccine to facilitate your travel.
Understand the COVID testing and vaccine requirements for all countries that you will transit through to your destination.
North Caucasus (including Chechnya and Mount Elbrus) – Level 4: Do Not Travel
Terrorist attacks and risk of civil unrest continue throughout the North Caucasus region, including in Chechnya, North Ossetia, Ingushetia, Dagestan, Stavropol, Karachayevo-Cherkessiya, and Kabardino-Balkariya. Local gangs have kidnapped U.S. citizens and other foreigners for ransom. There have been credible reports of arrest, torture, and extrajudicial killing of LGBTI persons in Chechnya allegedly conducted by Chechen regional authorities.
Do not attempt to climb Mount Elbrus, as travelers must pass close to volatile and insecure areas of the North Caucasus region. The U.S. government is unable to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens traveling in the North Caucasus region, including Mount Elbrus, as U.S. government employees are prohibited from traveling to the region.
Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.
Crimea – Level 4: Do Not Travel
The international community, including the United States and Ukraine, does not recognize Russia’s purported annexation of Crimea. There is extensive Russian Federation military presence in Crimea. Russia staged its further invasion of Ukraine, in part, from occupied Crimea, and Russia is likely to take further military actions in Crimea as part of its occupation of this part of Ukraine. There are continuing abuses against foreigners and the local population by the occupation authorities in Crimea, particularly against those who are seen as challenging their authority on the peninsula.
The U.S. government is unable to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens traveling in Crimea, as U.S. government employees are prohibited from traveling to Crimea.
Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.
Last Update: Reissued with updates to security and health information.

San Marino

See Italy

Serbia

April 19, 2022
Serbia – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution in Serbia due to crime.
Country Summary: Violence associated with organized crime and high-profile sporting events in Serbia is common.
Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Serbia.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Serbia has a high level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.
If you decide to travel to Serbia:
Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information.   
Be aware of your surroundings.
Do not display signs of wealth, such as expensive watches or jewelry.
Do not answer your door at your hotel/residence unless you know who it is.
Stay alert in locations frequented by Westerners.
Be extra vigilant when visiting banks or ATMs.
Carry a copy of your passport and visa (if applicable) and leave the original in your hotel safe.
Provide your itinerary to a family member or friend.
Monitor local media.
Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter
Review the Country Security Report for Serbia.
Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.
Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Slovakia

April 19, 2022
Slovakia – Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

Exercise normal precautions in Slovakia.
Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Slovakia.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Slovakia has a high level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Informationrelated to your travel.
If you decide to travel to Slovakia:
Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information.  
Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
Review the Country Security Report for Slovakia.
Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.
Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Slovenia

May 16, 2022
Slovenia – Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

Exercise normal precautions in Slovenia.
Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Slovenia.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Slovenia has a high level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Informationrelated to your travel.
If you decide to travel to Slovenia:

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information.
Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
Review the Country Security Report for Slovenia.
Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Spain

April 19, 2022
Spain – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution in Spain due to terrorism and civil unrest.
Country Summary: Terrorist groups continue plotting possible attacks in Spain. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, local government facilities, hotels, clubs, restaurants, places of worship, parks, major sporting and cultural events, educational institutions, airports, and other public areas.
Demonstrations are common. They may take place in response to political or economic issues, on politically significant holidays, and during international events.
Read the country information page for additional information on travel in Spain.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Spain has a high level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.
If you decide to travel to Spain:
Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel, and read the U.S. Embassy’s web page for country-specific COVID-19 information. 
Avoid demonstrations and crowds.
Be aware of your surroundings when traveling to tourist locations and crowded public venues.
Follow the instructions of local authorities.
Monitor local media for breaking events and adjust your plans based on new information.
Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
Review the Country Security Report for Spain.
Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.
Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Sweden

June 21, 2022
Sweden – Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.
Exercise normal precautions when traveling to Sweden.  
Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Sweden.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Sweden has a moderate level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel. 
If you decide to travel to Sweden:

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information.
Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
Review the Country Security Report for Sweden.
Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

🇨🇭 Switzerland

April 19, 2022
Switzerland – Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

Exercise normal precautions in Switzerland.
Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Switzerland.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Switzerland has a high level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Informationrelated to your travel.
If you decide to travel to Switzerland:
Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information.  
Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
Review the Country Security Reports for Switzerland.
Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.
Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Turkey

April 19, 2022
Turkey – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution when traveling to Turkey due to terrorism and arbitrary detentions. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.
Do Not Travel To:
Sirnak province, Hakkari province, and any area within six miles (ten kilometers) of the Syrian border due to terrorism.
Country Summary: Terrorist groups continue plotting possible attacks in Turkey. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, local government facilities, hotels, clubs, restaurants, places of worship, parks, major sporting and cultural events, educational institutions, airports, and other public areas.
Security forces have detained tens of thousands of individuals, including U.S. citizens, for alleged affiliations with terrorist organizations based on scant or secret evidence and grounds that appear to be politically motivated. U.S. citizens have also been subject to travel bans that prevent them from departing Turkey. Participation in demonstrations not explicitly approved by the Government of Turkey, as well as criticism of the government (including on social media) can result in arrest.
Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Turkey.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Turkey has a high level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.
If you decide to travel to Turkey:
Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information.   
Stay alert in locations frequented by tourists.
Avoid demonstrations and crowds.
Stay at hotels with identifiable security measures.
Monitor local media and be prepared to adjust your plans quickly.
Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
Review the Country Security Report for Turkey.
Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations.  Review the Traveler’s Checklist.
Sirnak Province, Hakkari Province, and Any Arewithin six miles (ten kilometers) of the Syrian Border – Level 4: Do Not Travel
Do not travel to Sirnak province, Hakkari province, or any area within six miles (ten kilometers) of the Turkey/Syria border due to the continued threat of attacks by terrorist groups, armed conflict, and civil unrest.Terrorist attacks, including suicide bombings, ambushes, car bomb detonations, and improvised explosive devices, as well as shootings, and illegal roadblocks leading to violence have occurred in these areas. U.S. government employees are restricted from traveling to these provinces and to any area within six miles (ten kilometers) of the Turkey/Syria border without prior approval.
Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.
Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Ukraine

April 19, 2022
Ukraine – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Do not travel to Ukraine due to Russian military invasion and COVID-19. U.S. citizens in Ukraine should depart immediately if it is safe to do so using any commercial or other privately available ground transportation options. U.S. citizens should not travel to Ukraine due to the active armed conflict and the singling out of U.S. citizens in Ukraine by Russian government security officials. All U.S. citizens should carefully monitor U.S. government notices and local and international media outlets for information about changing security conditions and alerts to shelter in place. Those remaining in Ukraine should exercise increased caution due to the potential for active combat, crime, and civil unrest. Read the entire Travel Advisory.  
U.S. citizens in Ukraine should depart immediately if it is safe to do so using any commercial or other privately available ground transportation options. U.S. citizens should not travel to Ukraine due to the active armed conflict and the singling out of U.S. citizens in Ukraine by Russian government security officials. All U.S. citizens should carefully monitor U.S. government notices and local and international media outlets for information about changing security conditions and alerts to shelter in place. Those remaining in Ukraine should exercise increased caution due to the potential for active combat, crime, and civil unrest. Read the entire Travel Advisory.
The security situation throughout Ukraine is highly volatile and conditions have deteriorated. U.S. citizens should remain vigilant and take appropriate steps to increase their security awareness. There are continued reports of U.S. citizens being singled out and detained by the Russian military in Ukraine and when evacuating by land through Russia-occupied territory or to Russia or Belarus. Know the location of your closest shelter or protected space. In the event of mortar or rocket fire, follow the instructions from local authorities and seek shelter immediately. If you feel your current location is no longer safe, you should carefully assess the potential risks involved in moving to a different location.
The U.S. Department of State suspended operations at U.S. Embassy Kyiv, effective February 28. All in-person consular services in Ukraine are suspended until further notice.
U.S. citizens seeking emergency assistance should email KyivACS@state.gov for assistance.   The U.S. government will not be able to evacuate U.S. citizens from Ukraine. Please review what the U.S. government can and cannot do to assist you in a crisis overseas. U.S. citizens may seek consular services, including requests for repatriation loans, passports, and visa services, at U.S. embassies and consulates in neighboring countries.
On February 24, the Ukrainian government declared a state of emergency. Each province (oblast) will decide on the measures to be implemented according to local conditions. Measures could include curfews, restrictions on the freedom of movement, ID verification, and increased security inspections, among other measures. Follow any state of emergency measures imposed in your oblast.
The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) prohibits U.S. civil aviation from flying in Ukrainian airspace. For more information, U.S. citizens should consult the Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions and Notices. Additionally, since February 24, when Russia’s forces began attacking major Ukrainian cities, the State Aviation Administration of Ukraine, the European Union Aviation Safety Agency, and the Federal Aviation Administration have prohibited flights into, out of, and over Ukraine due to ongoing military actions.
Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Ukraine.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Ukraine has an unknown level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel. 
Travel to High-Risk Areas
If you are not currently in Ukraine but choose to disregard the travel advisory not to enter Ukraine, you should consider taking the following steps prior to travel: 
Visit our website on Travel to High-Risk areas.
Draft a will and designate appropriate insurance beneficiaries and/or power of attorney.
Discuss a plan with loved ones regarding care/custody of children, pets, property, belongings, non-liquid assets (collections, artwork, etc.), funeral wishes, etc.
Share important documents, login information, and points of contact with loved ones so that they can manage your affairs if you are unable to return as planned to the United States. Leave DNA samples with your medical provider in case it is necessary for your family to access them. 
Establish your own personal security plan in coordination with your employer or host organization or consider consulting with a professional security organization.
Develop a communication plan with family and/or your employer or host organization so that they can monitor your safety and location as you travel through high-risk areas. This plan should specify who you would contact first, and how they should share the information. 
Enroll your trip in the State Department’s Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency. 
Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist
If you are currently in Ukraine: 
Read the Department’s country information page on Ukraine.
Familiarize yourself with information on what the U.S. government can and cannot do to assist you in a crisis overseas.
Have a contingency plan in place that does not rely on U.S. government assistance. 
Review the Traveler’s Checklist
Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk areas.
Monitor local media for breaking events and adjust your contingency plans based on the new information.
Ensure travel documents are valid and easily accessible. 
See the U.S. Embassy’s website regarding COVID-19
Get a COVID vaccine to facilitate your travel.
Understand the COVID testing and vaccine requirements for all countries that you will transit through to your destination. 
Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency. 
Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter
Review the Country Security Report for Ukraine.
Avoid demonstrations and crowds.
Last Update: Reissued with updates to the security situation and health information

United Kingdom

April 19, 2022
United Kingdom – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution in the United Kingdom due to terrorism.
Country Summary: Terrorist groups continue plotting possible attacks in the United Kingdom. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, local government facilities, hotels, clubs, restaurants, places of worship, parks, major sporting and cultural events, educational institutions, airports, and other public areas.
There is also a risk of isolated violence by dissident groups in Northern Ireland, focused primarily on police and military targets.
Read the country information page for additional information on travel to the United Kingdom.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined the United Kingdom has a high level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel and return to the United States.
If you decide to travel to the United Kingdom:
Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information.
Be aware of your surroundings when traveling to tourist locations and crowded public venues.
Follow the instructions of local authorities.
Monitor local media for breaking events and adjust your plans based on new information.
Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
Review the Country Security Report for the United Kingdom.
Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.
Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

The countries of Andorra, Holy See (Vatican), Kosovo, Liechtenstein, Monaco & San Marino were not included in the survey.

Areas to Avoid..

When checking into your hotel ask the concierge or staff what if any areas of the city to avoid. Large cities in Europe do have areas where of crime and juvenile delinquency is present.  Some countries have areas of inherit racism as well as organized crime and corruption. 

Belarus…US relations with Belarus have been strained since 2008 when the US Ambassador was expelled leaving only a staff of 5 at the US embassy. There is little protection under the law for US travelers.

Russia…areas in the North Caucasus region are the most dangerous for travel. Russia overall is not welcoming to LGBT travelers. In addition the United States has set sanctions against Russia for its invasion of Ukraine. Americans travelers could be targets for political leveraging by the Russian government because of the sanctions and the US’s international position against current Russian policies and activities.

Ukraine…Avoid traveling to the Crimea and the rest of Ukraine. Russia has invaded Ukraine and waged a fierce war against Ukraine.

Americans need to avoid travel to theses areas.

Amsterdam

The city is very safe, travel at night is safe for women and LGTBQ travelers should have no concerns. The Red Notice: Light district prohibits photographing prostitutes. Outer boroughs of Nieuw-West, Zuidoost and Noord have rougher neighborhoods.
Emergency: 112

Athens

Athens is generally safe but, with their share of pick pockets. Be aware that demonstrations and riots can be frequent. Areas to avoid are Omonoia Square and Philopapou Hill at night, Vathis Square with drug use, National Archaeological Museum & south end of 3 September Street where beggars congregate and the back streets of Piraeus at night. The area south of Omonoia near Pireos Street has reputed gangs and drugs.

Barcelona

The city is generally safe but, with a lot of tourists there are scams that target those not aware. Pick pockets work high tourists areas and some areas prostitutes can be aggressive. The beaches are areas where unattended loose items and be grabbed quickly. The Sants train station, Olympic Port, Raval, Les Rambles and St. Antoni are areas where scammers like to target tourists.

Berlin

Berlin is generally a safe city but, it has some un-maintained areas. Neukölln and Kreuzberg (between Hermannplatz, Schönleinstraße to Kottbusser Tor) and Wedding (Moabit and Gesundbrunnen) should be avoided at night. There have been racially-motiviated violence in the outskirts of East Berlin in Lichtenberg, Hellersdorf, Marzahn, Treptow and Köpenick so avoid at night.
As in most cities pick pockets are a problem in tourist areas and public transit.
Medical emergencies and fires, 112
Police emergency number, 110

Brussels

The city has taken on an image of being unsafe because of radicalized groups associated with recent terrorists attacks but, it is a very safe city none the less. The city center and much of the east, south and northwest of Brussels are safe. Areas of  Saint-Gilles ( near the Brussel-Zuid/Bruxelles-midi station), Matongé, Anneessens (around Place Fontainas), Molenbeek (next to the canal), Schaerbeek, and the Marolles should be taken with caution especially at night. Pick pockets are again a problem at tourist areas and on public transit.

Budapest

Budapest is potentially one of the safest cities in the world for its size. There are no slums or districts you should avoid, particularly not in the touristy areas or nearby. As a traveller, you should take only normal precautions: don’t show off your money and don’t wear flashy jewellery. Magyars tend to be friendly with foreigners; racism or xenophobia against tourists is practically unknown.
As in most other big cities, pickpocketing is the most common crime against tourists. 
Central Emergency: dial 112
Ambulance: 104
Fire: 105
Police: 107

Copenhagen

Copenhagen used to be one of the safest cities in the world and it is still quite safe compared to other cities of the same size. Like any metropolitan area, Copenhagen does however experience its share of criminal activity. While crime against strangers is mostly of the non-violent type, such as pickpocketing and petty theft, one should take precautions, in particular around busy tourist attractions, in train stations and inside the train to the airport. Due to gang-related conflict, extra precaution is advised in the neighborhood of Nørrebro and in the western suburbs, those municipalities to the west of Copenhagen proper.
While racism isn’t rampant it can occasionally be a problem for people of African or Middle Eastern descent.
Emergencies: 112
Non-Emergencies relating to Police: 114

Dublin

Dublin is generally a very safe city during the day by American and European standards but can be an intimidating place on weekend nights. As in most other large cities, a few crimes against the person, such as muggings, unprovoked attacks, and robberies, have been known to occur in Dublin. Treat Dublin as you would other Western cities, and be sensible: never walk in poorly-lit areas at night, especially alone. As Dublin centre is relatively compact, be aware that walking a few blocks can take you into some bad areas. Areas where crimes against foreigners have occurred include Rialto and western parts of the North Circular Road. Be especially vigilant or preferably avoid walking around the city centre altogether after bar closing times on weekends (02:30 – 03:00) when very drunk people looking to take advantage of other drunk people roam the streets and when violent behaviour and crime are most likely to occur. Most homicides in the city are gang related.
Never be afraid to approach Gardaí (police officers) to ask for help or directions – it is their job to help.
Emergency services: 999 or 112

Dubrovnik

Dubrovnik is a very safe city, though the usual precautions should be taken to protect yourself from pick-pocketing.
The streets in the old town can be quite slippery as they’ve been smoothed down for centuries by people walking over them. At night, avoid the smaller old town streets and stick to the more modern ones with street-lighting (Victorian gaslamps on brackets).

Edinburgh

In general Edinburgh can be considered a safe destination for visitors, but like all other major cities, it pays to remain attentive and use some common sense.
Like most other cities, there are some rundown areas. For its size, Edinburgh does not have many, but there are still some suburbs that are better avoided by anyone who is unfamiliar with the area such as the following: Niddrie and Craigmillar in the southeast of the city, Sighthill and Wester Hailes in the west, and Muirhouse and Pilton in the north.
Emergencies: 999
Local Police Station: 101

Florence

Florence is generally safe and healthy, but beware the inevitable purse-snatchers and pickpockets. They thrive in crowds, particularly around SMN railway station and on the buses, sometimes working with a decoy such as an insistent beggar. If you have a bag with a classy, noiseless zipper, it will be opened.
Also beware at night around tourist spots such as Ponte Vecchio where pickpocketers may approach you pretending to be drunk and friendly, and then snatch your belongings when your guard is down.

Frankfurt am Main

Frankfurt has one of Germany’s highest crime rates, due to: smuggling and similar offenses at the airport as well as anything concerning credit card fraud. Since the main credit card clearing company is based in Frankfurt all fraud in Germany is registered here.
Physical crime is in general concentrated in the red-light district around the central train station, which also is the hangout of many drug dealers/junkies, although even there you are usually safe during the day and moderate evening hours. Frankfurt is safe and it is highly unlikely that you will face armed robbery or other violent crimes. Use your common sense and avoid drunken or aggressive people at night. In general, firearms are an uncommon sight in Germany and the police have a very no-nonsense approach to people wielding guns or even knives. If shots are fired, the police are never far away, as this very rarely happens.
The central station area (Hauptbahnhof) is known for being a centre for homeless people and drug users. The situation has improved, but you will still occasionally be bothered by beggars. 
Emergencies: 110

Helsinki

The crime rate in Helsinki is generally low – Helsinki being maybe one of the safest capitals in Europe. Pickpockets target crowds and bicycles are prone to petty theft. Walking in the streets after dark is generally safe and the city centre is indeed quite lively until the early hours of the morning. However, it’s best to steer clear of obviously drunk people looking to pick a fight, the traditional trouble spots being the frustratingly long queues for late night snack food or taxis. Getting mugged for money in the streets of central Helsinki is almost unheard of.
The most crimes in city center concentrate around the central railway station and Kamppi shopping center. The Kaisaniemi park behind the main Railway Station is possibly best avoided at night, and the area of Kalasatama, Kallio and Sörnäinen (northeast from the center, after the Pitkäsilta bridge) may be somewhat rougher than other parts of the downtown. . Relatively high-crime neighborhoods are found in the 1970s concrete-built suburbs of Eastern Helsinki, Northwestern Helsinki and Northern Helsinki, mainly in the extreme reaches of the metro and local train, such as Kontula, Itäkeskus, Mellunmäki, Vuosaari along metro; Pukinmäki, Malmi, Puistola and Kannelmäki along local train. The suburbs too have their fair share of questionable characters. Finland violent crime generally takes place between people who know each other; strangers are rarely targeted.
Especially in the summer you will encounter Roma beggars from Eastern Europe sitting on the streets in the city centre. Most locals would prefer your not encouraging them by giving money, and donating to a charity instead.
Emergencies Services: 112 or +358 9 3104 4222

Istanbul

As with most European cities, but especially in crowded areas of Istanbul, watch your pockets and travel documents as pickpockets have devised all sorts of strategies to obtain them from you. Do not rely too much on the ‘safe’ feeling you get from the omnipresence of police.
If prices are not on display, always ask beforehand (even for a tea) instead of just ordering something like in Europe. This can be fatal in Istanbul because tourists are constantly overcharged. Unfortunately, often prices are not on display, like in sweet shops or even restaurants. Skip these places or ask for a price knowing what the approximate or fair price is.
Scams like selling unauthorized guided tours, restaurant, bar and metro scams, currency conversion and shoeshiners and taxis all overcharging. Always ask the cost of something as they will demand more money if you don’t.
Some men stalk foreign women and approach them for money or sex.
Tourism Police: +90 212 527 45 03

Kraków

Like the rest of Poland, Kraków is generally a very safe city with strong police presence. Violent behaviour is rare and if it occurs it is most likely alcohol-related. While pubs and clubs are generally very safe, the nearby streets may be scenes of brawls, especially late at night. Women and girls are generally less likely to be confronted or harassed since the Polish code of conduct strictly prohibits any type of violence (physical or verbal) against women.
Pickpockets operate, pay attention to your belongings in crowds, at stations, in crowded trains/buses (especially to/from the airport), and clubs.
In any case, do not be afraid to seek help or advice from the Police (Policja) or the Municipal Guard (Straż Miejska). They are generally helpful, polite and in most cases speak at least basic English.
As a result of Nazi German and Soviet terror, modern Poland is a very homogeneous society. 
Sometimes scams are perpetrated on tourists at overcharging at bars for drinks, taxis on fares, disguised hotel employee asking for credit card, and money exchanges overcharging. Never give credits numbers to unknown individuals without confirming who they really are.

Lisbon

The most common crime against tourists is pickpocketing and theft from rental cars or on public transport. The metro carriages can become crowded and opportune for pickpockets but simple precautions are enough to maintain your safety while travelling on them. There are some episodes of violent crimes (eg robberies) and some drug related crimes in places such as Bairro Alto and Santos, especially at night.
The Baixa area is not inhabited by a lot of people – as soon as the shops and offices close at night, the area can become sketchy with muggers – caution is needed in back streets and do not walk alone.
Be aware of certain types offering ‘hash’ or ‘chocolate’, especially in the downtown area on and around Rua Augusta. It’s also encouraged to be wary of the IntendenteMartim Moniz area. 
Young tourists will likely be approached by many people with scams especially near the Chiado Plaza

Ambulance, Fire, Police: 112.

London

Big problems do exist with drug abuse, begging, pick pocketing and theft.
Areas outside central London should be avoided at night- Brixton, Peckham and Hackney. Within northwest London Harlesden and north Camden.
Scams are targeted on unsuspecting tourist like, tissues sellers, cup & ball game, ATM scams, stres test, donations, overzealous street performers and clip joints.
Police, Ambulance, Fire or Rescue: 112 or 999 connects to all.

Madrid

Madrid is a very safe city, with some of the lowest crime rates among Europe’s largest cities. The police is highly visible, and the city is equipped with cameras. There are always people in the streets, even at night time, so you can walk across the city generally without fear. Travellers who remain aware of their surroundings, and keep an eye on their belongings, should have little to worry about.
Much like other big European cities, Madrid has its fair share of nonviolent pickpocket crime, though it is nowhere near the stratospheric levels of cities like Rome or Barcelona. Some areas with acute pickpocketing problems include Gran Via (especially near Plaza de Callao and Calle de Fuencarral), Puerta del Sol, and the AZCA business district.
Plaza Mayor and Puerta del Sol might be beauties to look at, but they are Meccas for scams.
Some neighbourhoods in the city’s south (especially Usera and Puente de Vallecas) and east (Ciudad Lineal) are both marginally less well-off and sketchier than the rest of Madrid, and they might give off an uneasy feel. They are safer than many “bad neighbourhoods” in other western European countries, but be on your guard at night.
Madrid’s southern suburbs such as Móstoles, Alcorcón, and Alcala de Henares have a reputation for being sketchy at night, but sticking to well-lit and crowded streets will be enough to keep you safe.
Several streets north of Gran Via, though very lively, have been known to attract seedy crowds at night.

Milan

Unless you venture into the dangerous suburbs, Milan is a rather safe city. Certain areas near Loreto, the central railway station, and Porto di Mare (Southern end of the yellow metro line) can be unsafe at night.
Beware of the migrant vendors in the streets: most of the merchandise they sell is imitation/fake luxury goods. 
Watch for scammers giving free goods in the tourist areas around the Duomo and Castello Sforzesco

Munich

Boasting one of the lowest crime rates of any major European city, Munich is a very safe city for residents and travelers alike, and violent crime is rare. Walking around, day or night, is not an issue, and you will most likely not encounter any crime at all, though you should still take the usual precautions against pickpocketing (especially in the central districts of Altstadt-Lehel and the Ludwigsvorstadt area immediately south of the central station), such as not leaving your camera unattended or venturing alone through parks at night. While some of Munich’s boroughs like Neuperlach and Hasenbergl have a reputation for seediness among locals, crime levels are actually average.
Emergencies: 112

Oslo

Oslo is generally a safe city, but as in any metropolitan area, some caution is warranted. Violent crime is rare, but not unheard of. Avoid getting in to quarrels in taxi queues after closing hours of bars. Avoid groups of drunk young men. The police advise that the area along the Akerselva river from Grønland to Cuba is best avoided after dark. It is known for instances of rape, muggings and drug dealing. Though Oslo isn’t as dangerous as many places around the world, there are a few working-class areas that many locals would advise people not to visit at night, some of which are: Stovner, Holmlia, and Grønland/Tøyen.
Women should remain vigilant at night and when clubs and pubs are closing. Avoid walking alone through parks and poorly lit areas of the city. Do not, under any circumstances, use “pirate taxis” or other unofficial transportation.
Theft and pick pocketing is a nuisance. Normal precautionary rules apply:
If you are yourself subject to criminal acts, or witness a crime, it is generally accepted to report or tip it to the police. It is a welcome contribution to better public safety.

Police (Emergency only): 112
Police (non-emergencies) 02800 (in country only), +47 22 66 90 50 (Oslo Police District)
Fire (Emergency only): 110
Ambulance: 113

Paris

Paris is considered as a quite safe city. You can wander in almost every district with a very low risk of mugging. However, some areas are safer than others. Areas in the city avoid at night are around the Châtelet Les Halles, Gare du Nord / Gare de l’Est area , Porte de Montreuil station, Bois de Boulogne, Northern 18th and 19th district, specifically at night, around Marx Dormoy, Porte de la Chapelle, La Chappelle, Porte de Clignancourt, Porte de la Villette. Statistically, Paris remains very safe. 
Police: 17

Prague

Prague is a very safe city. You’re less likely to be victim of a serious crime in Prague than in most Western European or US cities. It is safe for women to venture out alone, even in the dead of night.
The most common crimes in Prague by far are car theft and pickpocketing is can be encountered in Prague. Be aware of teams of pickpockets that lurk outside metro stations, overcrowded trams, Charles Bridge, Wenceslas Square and the Old Town Square.
As a party destination, it is common to encounter drunk partygoers, but most of the time the rowdy ones will be fellow tourists; exercise the same caution you would when dealing with any drunk person. The only area with a high concentration of homeless is in front of the central station.
Begging occurs at the city’s top tourist attractions and in some of the main public transport hubs.
Be careful with money exchanges. Exchange your money in banks or official tourist information centres and avoid exchange offices. 
Emergencies: 112
Police: 158
Ambulance: 155
Fire: 150

Rome

Rome is generally a safe place, even for women traveling alone. Pick pockets are the biggest problem for travelers at tourists hot spots, Trevi Fountain, Spanish Steps, the Colosseum and the Termini train station. Scams for fake products sold on the streets to tickets sold outside popular attractions.
It has high level of pickpocketers especially at tourists sights. Take all precautions to keep items secured and out of reach.
Emergencies: 112
Police: 113
Fire: 115
First Aid: 118

Stockholm

Stockholm is a safe city by international standards. Still, travellers should use common sense to avoid crime.
Stockholm has patrolling security guards (ordningsvakt) in central neighbourhoods. These are usually helpful to visitors.
Drunkenness is less accepted in bars and clubs than in smaller towns, and could lead to the security staff forcibly ejecting the trouble-maker. Bouncers in Stockholm are stricter than in other European cities, and you may be kicked out for no reason.
Most crimes against travellers are crimes of opportunity, such as pickpockets, bicycle theft, auto theft, and auto vandalism.
Taxis are required to post pricing information in the rear side window. Major cab companies (Taxi Stockholm, Taxi KurirTaxi 020/Sverigetaxi and Topcab) are around 300 kr. With these cabs, you also have a better chance of having belongings lost in the car returned to you.
During summer, groups of street gamblers try to scam their audience in other touristed areas, by planting a few of their own in the crowd. Don’t play, you will lose.
Stockholm has far fewer homeless and impoverished people than other cities of similar size, homeless people can be seen begging around the city.
Stockholm is friendly to sexual minorities. Homophobic and transphobic attitudes will be met with outright hostility from many Swedes. Same-sex couples will have no trouble living openly in Stockholm, which includes holding hands or kissing in public around the city.

Venice

Venice is considered a safe city. You have to take the habitual travellers’ precautions however. Keep your valuable items (like wallet and passport) close to you because there are pickpockets, especially in more crowded parts of the city.
Emergencies: 112
Police: 113
Medical Emergencies: 118

Vienna

Vienna is potentially one of the safest cities in the world for its size. There are no slums or districts you should avoid. In general, you can visit any part of the city at any time of the day without taking many risks — just use your common sense. The Prater (fair grounds/amusement park area) is said by some locals to be less safe at night, though more in reference to pickpockets than anything else. The Praterstern railway station is a magnet for drunks, homeless people and drug addicts, but they generally do not bother passers-by. As a general rule of thumb, its best to avoid train stations, parks (especially Reumannplatz) and some larger subway stations at night, but even then, nothing bad should happen to you.
As in any major city, watch out for pickpockets who grab and run when boarding the U-Bahn.
Prostitution is legal, even on the street, and is common around the area of the Prater.
In crowded areas such as train stations or the city center, it is not uncommon be approached by beggars.
Fire department: 122
Police: 133
Ambulance/Rescue: 144
Mountain rescue: 140
Medical assistance: 141
Breakdown- or traffic accident help: 120 (OEAMTC), 123 (ARBOE)

Warsaw

Warsaw is a safe city overall. The city center has a strong police presence and is generally a very safe area. The Praga districts used to be dangerous. The bus and rail stations can be a magnet for homeless and drunkards, who, for the most part, will leave you alone.
Some areas south of the Palace of Culture and Science and the train station have a rather seedy feel to them, especially at night. Same goes for much of the neighborhoods immediately surrounding Warsaw-Chopin airport.
You should be careful to hold onto your belongings when in a large crowd or on buses (Number 175, which runs from the airport to city center, is reportedly infamous for pickpockets). At bars and clubs you’re going to want to keep extra care of your wallet, passport, cell phone, and camera.
Women and girls are generally less likely to be confronted or harassed since the Polish code of conduct strictly prohibits any type of violence (physical or verbal) against women.
Visitors not knowing Polish may also be the target of “bar girls,” especially in Underground off of ul. Mazowiecka on days where there isn’t a cover charge. Be cautious if you encounter a girl speaking English who will offer you a drink or a cigarette.
Emergencies: 112
Police: 997
Firef: 998
Ambulance: 999

Zürich

Zürich, like all cities in Switzerland, is relatively safe. Nevertheless, be on guard for thieves and pickpockets. In particular, thieves are known to operate around the Zurich main train station.
Certain areas along the lakefront are frequented by young people who sometimes try to pick a fight when they are drunk. 
Ambulance: 144
Emergencies: 112